Interviews Mistakes That Can Cost You That Job

interview mistakes to avoid

The interview stage is critical in recruitment as it gives employers an opportunity to ascertain what the resume portrays. This means that it is critical that you are ready for the interview, and most importantly that you avoid certain mistakes that could make you lose the opportunity.

We have come up with the most common interview mistakes that candidates make so that you may be aware and avoid them.

 

1. Failing to conduct Research

failing to do reserach

You shouldn’t just wake up and go for an interview without at least knowing a few basic things about the company and the position.  Take your time to find out what the company does, what the role is about and then try and align it with your qualifications and experience. The more information you have about the potential employer, their clients and their product, the better for you. Bear in mind that you are interviewing the company as they interview you. you also would like to find out if the culture, working environment and values are good for you. research helps you establish that. 

2. Talking Ill About Previous Employer

Dropping negative vibes about your previous employer can shift gears in an interview session and spin the odds against your favour. Speaking negatively about another employer makes your interviewer wonder whether you might speak ill of them when you leave. It also portrays you as a negative, vindictive and petty person. since more employers are now looking at soft skills in candidates these days, it might cost you the opportunity you are interviewing for.  

3. Sharing Too Much Information

questions asked by interviewers are to gauge your suitability for the role and your fit in the company’s culture. You should answer these questions comprehensively and accurately. It is, however, prudent to draw a line between what is appropriate and what is just too much information. So, how can you tell whether you are crossing the line? First, you can time your answers to a minute, at most a minute and a half for when you need to cite examples. You can also read your interviewer’s body language, are they starting to get uncomfortable? do they look satisfied with your response? it is probably time to stop.

4. Failing To Ask Questions

Answering interview questions is just part of the interview. The other part is asking questions when it’s your turn. You can conduct as much research as you want about a role, but you might not get all the answers you need to make your decision once an offer is made. Use the time during an interview to ask questions about the role, management, projects you might participate or spearhead, the culture of the organisation, working hours, among other aspects of the employee life. 

5. Wrong Body Language

Body language is critical when dealing with people. You may be saying something, but your body language says another. your eye contact, facial expressions, gestures and even sitting position may say a lot about your attitude, readiness and even confidence levels. If you feel something about your body language is wanting, start working on it by using friends and colleagues to give you feedback. 

6. Telling Fibs

lying in interviews

As tempting as falsifying information to suit the requirements of a role may be, please desist from fabricating or embellishing information. The truth somehow finds its way out and will work against you. Telling lies is not only unethical, but it could get you in legal trouble as well.  Honesty remains the best policy.

7. Poor Timing in Salary Discussion

While remuneration is an important part of the interview discussion, ensure that you are not the first to raise it, unless the discussion comes to an end and it hasn’t been raised yet.

 

36 thoughts on “Interviews Mistakes That Can Cost You That Job

    1. Hi Shalom,
      The question of is not something that can be answered with a blanket reply. You need to conduct research before going for the interview. Ask people who work there how much the company pays. Look at their reviews online. Research in jb sites how much that particular role pays in the industry because different industries differ. Then finally decide on a reasonable range and always let the interviewer know that it is negotiable.

      ^DM

  1. i really appreciate your way of educating me on some of this important, but forgotten tips in interview , i would like to state here that after reading through this i gained a lot of confident to attend any interview . thanks

    1. Hi Edward,
      The question of is not something that can be answered with a blanket reply. You need to conduct research before going for the interview. Ask people who work there how much the company pays. Look at their reviews online. Research in job sites how much that particular role pays in the industry because different industries differ. Then finally decide on a reasonable range and always let the interviewer know that it is negotiable.
      ^DM

  2. These points are really true, it will help us a lot if and only if we are to pay attention to them.. Thanks anyway for sharing and letting us know more about these, cox l knew some but not all. thanks once again

  3. what will be the answer if i am been asked about how much will i take as my salary for a month looking at my qualification as a 1st degree holder in Business Admi. in Marketing

    1. Hello Prince,
      The question of is not something that can be answered with a blanket reply. You need to conduct research before going for the interview. Ask people who work there how much the company pays. Look at their reviews online. Research in jb sites how much that particular role pays in the industry because different industries differ. Then finally decide on a reasonable range and always let the interviewer know that it is negotiable.

      ^DM

  4. Please is it compulsory to say something about the company even if you do not know?
    Can one say he is leaving his job because of poor remuneration since he has no other reason for leaving his previous job in a job interview ?

    1. Hello Anthony,
      Most of us do not have good reasons for leaving previous engagements. The issue of what you say is usually about how you say more than the what. The danger is being misunderstood by the panel as a complainer or being unreasonable. So if you are going to talk about poor pay, make sure you phrase your answer really well. Also, remember better opportunities or growth opportunities do not only apply to your role and the tasks you are doing. A better opportunity also reflects on the pay you are going to get. So when you say you are looking for a better opportunity, you are technically right to infer that its about the money as well.

      ^DM

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